Lawrence/Stanley Family Genealogy Pages

Discovering our American, Canadian and European Ancestors

Daniel Davis, Captain[1]

Male 1742 - 1807  (65 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Daniel Davis 
    Suffix Captain 
    Born 12 Oct 1742  Oxford, Worcester Co., Ma Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Veteran Revolutionary War Ct Capt Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Reference Number 1499 
    _UID CD920F7083E4F944A0CC52266BEBAE39A32E 
    Died 4 Nov 1807  Waterford Twp., Washington Co., Oh Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried Nr Blockhouse, Nr. Beverly, Wash. Co., Oh Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I42424  Earnest
    Last Modified 28 Dec 2004 

    Family Elizabeth Whitmore,   b. 28 Aug 1742, Killingly, Windham County, Ct Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Sep 1806, Waterford, Washington Co, Oh Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years) 
    Married 2 Dec 1762  Killingly, Windham County, Ct Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    _UID CA750885F4D2AC43AA2FE5DC6D1DF47B14E6 
    Children 
     1. Willard Davis,   b. 12 Nov 1764, Killingly, Windham Co., Ct. Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Tamar Davis,   b. 23 Aug 1766, Killingly, Windham Co, . Ct. Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Walter Davis,   b. 4 Nov 1768
     4. Elizabeth Davis,   b. 21 May 1771
     5. William Davis,   b. 30 Oct 1772
     6. Daniel Davis,   b. 30 Nov 1774, Killingly, Windham Co., Ct. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 May 1867, Stockholm, St. Lawrence Co. New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years)
     7. Hezekiah Davis,   b. 15 Sep 1776
     8. Jessie Davis,   b. 23 Jul 1778
     9. Asa Davis,   b. 20 Sep 1780, Killingly, Windham County, Ct Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 May 1834, Mc Farlan Prec., Hardin County, Il Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 53 years)
     10. Lucena Davis,   b. 7 Sep 1782, Killingly, Ct. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Oct 1857, Huntington Co. in Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     11. Elizabeth Davis,   b. 15 Oct 1784
    Family ID F13933  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • [norvan.ged]

      CAPTAIN IN REVOLUTIONARY WAR FROM CT.

      ONE OF FORTY EIGHT MEN WITH GENERAL PUTMAN THAT SETTLED MARIETTA, OHIO.
      THE FIRST SETTLEMENT INOHIO.!PARENTS-BIRTH-MARRIAGE-CHILDREN-DEATH-BURIAL: Genealogy of SamuelDavis of
      Oxford, Mass., and Joseph Davis, of Dudley, Mass., and Their Descendants,
      Compiler and publisher, George L. Davis, North Andover Mass., published1884,
      pages 12, 47 and 48.

      !SOURCE: Colonial American Genealogy Library who obtained it from: TheBowens
      of Woodstock 193, Family Rep: Austin Wilder Child, Submitter: EvaNebekar, 217
      No. Johnson, Pocatello, Idaho.

      BIOGRAPHY: Capt. Daniel Davis lived in his young manhood on his father'sfarm
      in the easterly part of Killingly, Connecticut and moved soon aftercoming of
      age to Thompson Parish. He bought land in various quarters, and was very
      active in society and public affairs.
      Daniel was very active during the Revolutionary War. He was chosen at thevery
      outset to collect donations for the relief of the poor in Boston, andretained
      throughout in many responsible services, such as recruiting andoutfitting men
      for the army and also providing for the families of those who had enteredthe
      service. His patriotism induced him to sacrifice his own property for the
      public good, advancing money, which was repaid in depreciated currency,till
      his estate was seriously involved. Daniel fought personally during thewar and
      was promoted to the rank of a captain, where he often led his company into
      battle.
      After the return of peace his attention was turned to the subject ofwestward
      emigration, and he joined the "Company of Ohio Associates," which, underGen.
      Rufus Putnam, traversed the wilderness in the spring of 1788, and beganthe
      settlement of Ohio.
      In the autumn of 1785, General Benjamin Tupper, authorized by Congress,went
      to the Ohio country as surveyor. Due to the hostility of the Indians, hewas
      unable to complete a survey but from what he saw and heard of the West,he was
      enthusiastically in favor of settling the Ohio country as soon aspossible. In
      January, 1786, he met with General Rufus Putnam, at Rutland,Massachusetts,
      and that meeting resulted in an agreement to attempt to form a company to
      purchase and settle the Western lands on the Ohio.
      At a meeting in November 1787, the directors of the Ohio Company selected
      surveyors of the lands they had purchased in the West. At the samemeeting,
      they employed a number of workmen, including carpenters, boat-builders,and
      blacksmiths to make preparations for the journey to the Ohio Valley.After all
      needed supplies and livestock were procured, they were assembled with the
      workmen at Danvers Massachusetts where they started out on their journeywest.
      "They took their dreary way over the Alleghenies, and by the old Indianpath,
      over Braddock's Road, and after about a month's journey reached the
      Youghiogheny at a point called Simrall's Ferry." There, they were met by
      General Putnam with a smaller party made up of the surveyors and otherleading
      men. On the banks of the Youghiogheny, the workers constructed the craftwhich
      was to be used to carry the settlers to their new land. They called it"The
      Mayflower". This boat was the largest that had ever descended the Ohio.On the
      afternoon of April 2, 1788, the "Mayflower" under the command of CaptainDuval
      and accompanied by a flat-boat and several canoes, was unfastened from her
      moorings at Simrall's Ferry to float down the Youghiogheny to the watersof
      the Monongahela, and onward to the Ohio. At noon on April 7th, theyreached
      their destination and landed on the east bank of the Muskingum, about four
      hundred yards above its mouth and nearly opposite to Fort Harmar. Thelittle
      company that disembarked on the bank of the Muskingum on April 7, 1788,
      numbered forty eight souls.
      A tradition widely held among his descendants is that Daniel Davis was the
      second man ashore when "The Mayflower" struck upon Point Harmar, 7 April,
      1788, and, as he afterward declared, wishing to do something of which his
      posterity would speak with pride, cut the first tree felled by a settlerwest
      of the Ohio River. This tree being a "buckeye", or horse-chestnut, the
      incident gave to the State the name which it still retains. The sons ofCapt.
      Daniel Davis were all born in Connecticut, and excepting Willard, theeldest,
      who remained in his native state, went with their father to Ohio, wherethey
      matured amid the unfavorable circumstances of a frontier life.Opportunities
      for education and advancement were few, and they were early familiarizedwith
      the perils of Indian warfare and the hardships of garrison and campaignlife,
      and spent many months of their early manhood in the old fort which stoodon
      the banks of the Muskingum River, near Waterford, the place of theirfather's
      residence. Notwithstanding these adverse conditions, most or all of themarose
      to fill the positions of honorable and useful citizens, whose influencefor
      good was marked and widely and permanently felt.
      In 1789 he settled at Waterford, Ohio, where he passed the remainder ofhis
      life. After General Wayne's victory over the Miamis in 1794, he settleddown
      to the peaceful pursuits of life and aided very materially in forming the
      institutions of the new State. His strong mind and prudent forecast gavehim
      great influence, and he became a power for good in the section with whichhe
      was identified, helping forward every work which would tend to itselevation
      and advancement.
      Elizabeth died 16 Sep 1806 in Waterford, Washington County, Ohio, and was
      buried Sep 1806 at the Blockhouse near Beverly, Washington County, Ohio.

      BIOGRAPHY: Daniel died 4 Nov 1807 in Waterford Township, WashingtonCounty,
      Ohio, and was buried at the Blockhouse, near Beverly, Washington County,Ohio.

      !BIOGRAPHY: Genealogy of Samuel Davis of Oxford, Massachusetts, and Joseph
      Davis, of Dudley, Massachusetts and Their Descendants; Compiled by GeorgeL.
      Davis, North Andover, Massachusetts published 1884, page 47 and Appendix,
      page 507.
      DAR Patriot Index-National Society of the DAR, 7th printing, March 1981,Cat #
      Library of Congress 67-27776, page 178.
      Footprints of the Pioneers in the Ohio Valley, by W. H. Venable, pages 35
      through 47,
      History of Washington County Ohio 1788-1881 by H.Z. Williams, pages 362,532,
      541 & 551 and
      Birthplace Of The Northwest Territory, Published 1938 By The Marietta
      Northwest Territory Celebration Commission, Page 13.
      !PARENTS-BIRTH-MARRIAGE-CHILDREN-DEATH-BURIAL: Genealogy of Samuel Davisof
      Oxford, Mass., and Joseph Davis, of Dudley, Mass., and Their Descendants,
      Compiler and publisher, George L. Davis, North Andover Mass., published1884,
      pages 12, 47 and 48.

      !SOURCE: Colonial American Genealogy Library who obtained it from: TheBowens
      of Woodstock 193, Family Rep: Austin Wilder Child, Submitter: EvaNebekar, 217
      No. Johnson, Pocatello, Idaho.

      BIOGRAPHY: Capt. Daniel Davis lived in his young manhood on his father'sfarm
      in the easterly part of Killingly, Connecticut and moved soon aftercoming of
      age to Thompson Parish. He bought land in various quarters, and was very
      active in society and public affairs.
      Daniel was very active during the Revolutionary War. He was chosen at thevery
      outset to collect donations for the relief of the poor in Boston, andretained
      throughout in many responsible services, such as recruiting andoutfitting men
      for the army and also providing for the families of those who had enteredthe
      service. His patriotism induced him to sacrifice his own property for the
      public good, advancing money, which was repaid in depreciated currency,till
      his estate was seriously involved. Daniel fought personally during thewar and
      was promoted to the rank of a captain, where he often led his company into
      battle.
      After the return of peace his attention was turned to the subject ofwestward
      emigration, and he joined the "Company of Ohio Associates," which, underGen.
      Rufus Putnam, traversed the wilderness in the spring of 1788, and beganthe
      settlement of Ohio.
      In the autumn of 1785, General Benjamin Tupper, authorized by Congress,went
      to the Ohio country as surveyor. Due to the hostility of the Indians, hewas
      unable to complete a survey but from what he saw and heard of the West,he was
      enthusiastically in favor of settling the Ohio country as soon aspossible. In
      January, 1786, he met with General Rufus Putnam, at Rutland,Massachusetts,
      and that meeting resulted in an agreement to attempt to form a company to
      purchase and settle the Western lands on the Ohio.
      At a meeting in November 1787, the directors of the Ohio Company selected
      surveyors of the lands they had purchased in the West. At the samemeeting,
      they employed a number of workmen, including carpenters, boat-builders,and
      blacksmiths to make preparations for the journey to the Ohio Valley.After all
      needed supplies and livestock were procured, they were assembled with the
      workmen at Danvers Massachusetts where they started out on their journeywest.
      "They took their dreary way over the Alleghenies, and by the old Indianpath,
      over Braddock's Road, and after about a month's journey reached the
      Youghiogheny at a point called Simrall's Ferry." There, they were met by
      General Putnam with a smaller party made up of the surveyors and otherleading
      men. On the banks of the Youghiogheny, the workers constructed the craftwhich
      was to be used to carry the settlers to their new land. They called it"The
      Mayflower". This boat was the largest that had ever descended the Ohio.On the
      afternoon of April 2, 1788, the "Mayflower" under the command of CaptainDuval
      and accompanied by a flat-boat and several canoes, was unfastened from her
      moorings at Simrall's Ferry to float down the Youghiogheny to the watersof
      the Monongahela, and onward to the Ohio. At noon on April 7th, theyreached
      their destination and landed on the east bank of the Muskingum, about four
      hundred yards above its mouth and nearly opposite to Fort Harmar. Thelittle
      company that disembarked on the bank of the Muskingum on April 7, 1788,
      numbered forty eight souls.
      A tradition widely held among his descendants is that Daniel Davis was the
      second man ashore when "The Mayflower" struck upon Point Harmar, 7 April,
      1788, and, as he afterward declared, wishing to do something of which his
      posterity would speak with pride, cut the first tree felled by a settlerwest
      of the Ohio River. This tree being a "buckeye", or horse-chestnut, the
      incident gave to the State the name which it still retains. The sons ofCapt.
      Daniel Davis were all born in Connecticut, and excepting Willard, theeldest,
      who remained in his native state, went with their father to Ohio, wherethey
      matured amid the unfavorable circumstances of a frontier life.Opportunities
      for education and advancement were few, and they were early familiarizedwith
      the perils of Indian warfare and the hardships of garrison and campaignlife,
      and spent many months of their early manhood in the old fort which stoodon
      the banks of the Muskingum River, near Waterford, the place of theirfather's
      residence. Notwithstanding these adverse conditions, most or all of themarose
      to fill the positions of honorable and useful citizens, whose influencefor
      good was marked and widely and permanently felt.
      In 1789 he settled at Waterford, Ohio, where he passed the remainder ofhis
      life. After General Wayne's victory over the Miamis in 1794, he settleddown
      to the peaceful pursuits of life and aided very materially in forming the
      institutions of the new State. His strong mind and prudent forecast gavehim
      great influence, and he became a power for good in the section with whichhe
      was identified, helping forward every work which would tend to itselevation
      and advancement.
      Elizabeth died 16 Sep 1806 in Waterford, Washington County, Ohio, and was
      buried Sep 1806 at the Blockhouse near Beverly, Washington County, Ohio.

      BIOGRAPHY: Daniel died 4 Nov 1807 in Waterford Township, WashingtonCounty,
      Ohio, and was buried at the Blockhouse, near Beverly, Washington County,Ohio.

      !BIOGRAPHY: Genealogy of Samuel Davis of Oxford, Massachusetts, and Joseph
      Davis, of Dudley, Massachusetts and Their Descendants; Compiled by GeorgeL.
      Davis, North Andover, Massachusetts published 1884, page 47 and Appendix,
      page 507.
      DAR Patriot Index-National Society of the DAR, 7th printing, March 1981,Cat #
      Library of Congress 67-27776, page 178.
      Footprints of the Pioneers in the Ohio Valley, by W. H. Venable, pages 35
      through 47,
      History of Washington County Ohio 1788-1881 by H.Z. Williams, pages 362,532,
      541 & 551 and
      Birthplace Of The Northwest Territory, Published 1938 By The Marietta
      Northwest Territory Celebration Commission, Page 13.

  • Sources 
    1. [S460] norvan.ged.
      Date of Import: Sep 5, 2000